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COVID-19: Which African airlines are taking off and when?

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Since 25 June, Royal Air Maroc began operating a portion of its domestic flights (Agadir, Dakhla, Laâyoune, and Oujda) from its Casablanca hub, followed by its other hubs, Marrakech and Tangier. The low-cost airline Air Arabia Maroc will also resume operations on the same date, while Air Côte d’Ivoire will reopen for business on 26 June.

However, for many airlines, the situation is less certain. The pan-African carrier ASKY Airlines, which provides service to destinations from Lomé, is waiting for African countries to open their borders before making any announcements. Similarly, Air Algérie has not announced an operations resumption date. Plagued by major financial difficulties, Air Mauritius is set to get back to business on 1 September, whereas RwandAir has suspended its flights until further notice.

On 25 June, Egypt Air said it would resume international flights gradually as of 1 July. The first round from 1 – 7 July will include: Abu Dhabi, Addis Ababa, Amsterdam, Paris, Toronto, and Washington DC (among others).

As of 8 June, South Africa’s Airlink began taking bookings, while Safair began flights on 15 June. Mango, the low-cost airline of the near-bankrupt South African Airways (SAA) group, also resumed domestic flights as of 15 June.

South Africa has banned leisure travel until the 5-phase lockdown is entirely lifted. It is currently at level 3.

Many questions if South African Airways will be able to resume international flights given it was struggling with bankruptcy prior to the pandemic. A vote by SAA creditors has been postponed to July 16.

The gradual reopening of borders

In the intercontinental segment, Ethiopian Airlines and Kenya Airways will be providing service to Paris, Geneva, and Brussels in July, but with a reduced flight schedule. After a controversy sparked by the posting of a fake flight schedule on social media in May, Air France has listed several African capitals in its flight plan for July: Conakry, Cotonou, Douala, Yaoundé, Nouakchott, and Tunis. The airline is currently preparing landing authorization requests for the various countries concerned.

Resurrecting flights from Europe is pinned on both the ability to receive authorization from national civil aviation authorities and the reopening of the Schengen Area. In mid-June, the ECOWAS Ministerial Coordinating Committee for Transport, Logistics, Free Movement, and Trade recommended a gradual reopening of air borders: 15 July for flights between member states, 22 July for flights to non-member African countries and 1 August for intercontinental flights.

These projected dates come up against two obstacles: the health situation is neither clear nor stabilized in several African countries and fears about a second wave remain high in Europe. As a result, no one wants to be responsible for potentially importing cases in either direction.

For passengers, new restrictions are surfacing. For example, Congolese nationals stuck in Paris who want to get on an Air France repatriation flight will have to provide proof that they were tested for COVID-19 before boarding the flight upon their arrival in Brazzaville and Pointe-Noire. Once they have disembarked, they will have to undergo another COVID-19 screening and quarantine at a hotel.

Air Senegal targets mid-July for Paris flights

Airlines think it will take a while for businesses to return to pre-pandemic levels. Air Côte d’Ivoire, whose operations are currently limited to domestic destinations (Korogho, San Pedro, Bouaké, Man, and Odienné), accordingly plans on a gradual return to its normal service schedule: in a first phase, 25% of flights will resume, before increasing to 50%, all the while having no intention of giving up its expansion strategy in the long-haul segment.

Another example is that of Air Senegal, which resumed its service to Ziguinchor this past weekend, a destination it will get back to serving daily as of next week. While Senegal’s borders are to remain closed until 30 June, the young company, which sent all of its pilots to France to take a “refresher” flight simulator course, plans, according to our sources, to resume flights to Abidjan (four times a week, initially) and to Praia in mid-July. Air Senegal hopes to get back to operating flights to destinations such as Conakry, Bamako, Casablanca, Barcelona, and Marseille in early August, and, starting in September, Ouagadougou, Niamey, Accra, and Lagos. This means the airline could be operating 80% of its pre-pandemic flights at the end of August. Air Senegal will begin offering daily service to Abidjan in October if traffic allows for it.

The airline will know in the coming days if it will be able to resume its service to Paris in mid-July, as it hopes, with an initial schedule of five flights a week. “We can’t figure out how high demand will be. We don’t want to be in overcapacity, but we assume there will always be a segment of travelers who are flying to visit their loved ones,” says a source from Air Senegal, which is set to receive its two A321s in September and October and was the beneficiary of government grants of 45bn CFA francs (€68.5m), an amount which surpasses its target for the funding round scheduled in 2021.

Long-term schedule reductions

For the main West African operators, the crisis could bring about a more streamlined offering, while just before the pandemic many players were battling over small markets. “There were 320,000 seats available for flights between Abidjan and Dakar in a market with 150,000 to 170,000 passengers. The end result is that planes were operating at between 50% and 70% capacity.

The most predatory airlines will surely be more cautious and no longer operate as many flights as before,” says an executive from a West African carrier, adding that Brussels Airlines suspends its stopovers in Conakry and Ouagadougou when Kenya Airways and Vueling reduce their flight schedules.

What’s more, the financial situation of certain players like Air Burkina and Camair-Co, which have temporarily laid off their employees, makes a quick resumption of service more hypothetical than anything else.

Several firms are currently working on air traffic recovery scenarios for carriers and airports. “Three different realities are possible: traffic will fully resume despite the presence of COVID-19 cases, traffic will resume between certain countries that reopened their borders and traffic will resume without any particular restrictions in the absence of no new COVID-19 cases,” says Jean-Marc Bourreau, Global Director of Aviation at the Canadian firm CPCS. He is not counting on a broad-based rebound of air traffic.

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Farming, one of the key to Ghana’s dev’t – Asantehene

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Asantehene Otumfuo Osei Tutu II has said only farming will help Ghana to develop.

He said although the nation is extracting oil, farming stands tall among all the things that will help Ghana prosper.
Farming, the Asante monarch said, will help generate revenue for the nation and bring jobs to the people if much attention is paid to it.
The traditional leader noted that farming seems to have become the preserve of the aged while the youth seek for white-collar jobs.

Otumfuo Osei Tutu called on Ghanaians to get involved in farming to help develop the nation.
The Asantehene said this when the flagbearer of the Great Consolidated Popular Party (GCPP), Dr Henry Herbert Lartey, paid a courtesy call on him at the Manhyia Palace on Wednesday, 18 November 2020.
He said: “Ghana can only prosper through farming. We have oil and other resources but farming is key to our development; that is what will bring money and jobs”.
“We’ve been brainwashed to love white collar-jobs where we sit in the office while farming has been left for the aged”, the Asantehene observed.

Source: classFMonline.com

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18-year-old JHS car manufacturer’s design remade by Kantanka Automobile

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Kelvin Odartey, the 18-year-old JHS student who made a car’s design has been remanufactured by Kantanka Vehicles

– Safo Kantanka Jnr, the CEO of the car-manufacturing company, shared a photo of the car under construction and mentioned that it is called the Akofena – Although not fully confirmed, it is believed that Kantanka Automobile is making the new model in partnership with the young genius

Kantanka Automobile, led by the CEO of Kantanka Group of Companies, Kwadwo Safo Jnr, has manufactured a new car model called Kantanka Akofena

In a post sighted by kobbygossips.com on the personal Twitter handle of the CEO, he posted a photo of the car that was still being worked on at the factory. The Akofena, as shown by the image, took the same shape and form of the car that was manufactured by Kelvin Odartey, a young 18-year-old boy in junior high school

See the post below: As would be recalled, a video of the 18-year-old Junior High School (JHS) graduate who built a car with scraps went viral on social media weeks ago and after which got the chance to bag a scholarship from Kwadwo Safo Junior. The boy who caught the admiration of many on social media was said to have driven the self-made car to the examination centre to write his final paper. Although it is not fully confirmed, it is believed that Kantanka Automobile is manufacturing the new model in partnership with the young boy
18-year-old JHS car manufacturer’s design remade by Kantanka Automobile Source: Twitter, @kwadwosafo_Jnr Source: UGC
Source: Yen.com

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Meet ken kojo Adams, the young ghanaian whose paintings can make you go hungry

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Food as we all know is any nutritious substance that people or animals eat or drink in order to maintain life and growth.

I was sitting under a big mango tree one hot Saturday afternoon reminiscing on how granny used to force me just to eat from her kitchen when I used to stay with her in the village. A series of questions which I couldn’t get answers to kept running through my mind; why have we abandoned granny’s kitchen and going after fast food.

Food does more than fuelling and restoring the body with energy. According to study, some individuals going through depression recover quickly after taking in a very good meal, the satisfaction alone brings back some memories hence food being a solution to some of our psychological problems.

At the moment food is very prestigious and you can testify to the fact that food makes us keep some people in our memories and I can honestly say, I haven’t enjoyed groundnut soap for the past four years after i lost my mom, it’s very unfortunate that we are forgoing our culture in the name of technological advances and the acceptance of others culture. My people, we have to reclaim our tradition.

Culture is also influenced by food through various ways such as tradition, religion and family. This aspects are what makes us distinct from others and created a whole new society.

There are variety of food which represents the various ethnic groups in Ghana, and this is another rich culture we have to protect for the benefit of the future generations.

Gone are the days when we cherish our local foods but now we only take selfies with round open pie made with yeast dough and topped with tomato sauce, cheese, and a variety of other ingredients and we call that strength living, LOL, what made you forget about the fresh kontomire leaves with your fresh plantain or cocoyam….our generation has lost it we choosing weakness over strength.

This is the time to promote your own.

Let’s talk about “Banku”, I’m sorry wetting your appetite.

Banku is a Ghanaian dish which is cooked by a proportionate mixture of fermented corn and cassava dough in hot water into a smooth, whitish paste, served with soup, stew or a pepper sauce with fish. It is mostly preferred by the people of the Southern Regions of Ghana; the Ewe tribe of the Volta Region, the Fante and the Ga tribe but also eaten across the other regions in Ghana. Banku is found throughout Ghana, and is one of the staple foods enjoyed by all tribes in the country.

I feel that sharp pain in my heart whenever I remember some of the pioneers of this mouth watering meal files a letter of departure from Ghana. Could this be possible?, are we also going to say bye bye to the meal because they are the originators, this will probably lead to segregation which isn’t good and that’s why I suggest, just as banku and its captivating green accompaniment has been recognized and adapted by almost every ethnic group in Ghana, so should we know that we are one people and there is a common culture that holds us together.

No two ways about this, ‘banku’ is the most commonest meal every Ghanaian might have tasted, we enjoy that and have the originators in mind. Refusing to correct what is wrong is what makes it a mistake. Let love lead, Ghana.

Oh less I forget!
what’s your thought on left over Banku 😋.

Left over banku lasts for up to a week, and some prefer to keep it longer than that because the fermentation process gives it more flavour and taste if stored properly. I dare you to try that.

The best feeling is when grand mom gives you your favorite.

Below are paintings from the young artist.

Story by Ken Kojo Adams

@kenkojoadams
#madeinghana
#ghanafood1

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